Bring Out Those Board Games

In today’s world of tablets, smartphones, and other electronics, family game night does not have to be a thing of the past!
Playing board games with your children is a great way to practice speech and language skills.  Many board games offer the opportunity to practice turn taking, problem solving, numbers, counting, adding, and so much more.
For younger children, simply practicing taking turns, waiting, and understanding the rules of a game is important in helping them develop pragmatic language skills.  A few games that are great for younger children include:
Don’t Break the Ice
Hi-Ho Cherry O
Pop Up Pirate
Cootie
Connect 4
If your child is working on asking and answering questions, try playing Go-Fish or Guess Who.  The repetitive nature helps your child get plenty of practice with specific question forms and yes/no responses.
Articulation practice can be incorporated into almost any game.  Have the list of words or sentences your child is working on nearby, and make it a rule that everyone has to say a word/sentence before each turn.  To make this more fun, parents can “mess up” on the speech sounds, and let your child correct you :)
Another card game that is popular and great for practicing colors and numbers is Uno.
For children working on reading and literacy skills try playing Sorry, Scrabble, Scrabble Jr, or Scrabble Slam.

There are so many fun games available, and just as many ways you can incorporate speech and language practice into them!
Blog written by: Rebekah Greer
For further information please contact us at 941-360-0200 or visit us at www.pediatrictherapysolution.com

Receptive and Expressive Language Developmental Motor Milestones

Have you ever wondered if your child is on target with their speech and language development?  We have come up with an easy to read checklist to track his or her developmental progress:

Birth to 3 months

  • Smiles at the sound of your voice
  • Makes cooing, gurgling sounds
  • Turns head toward direction of sound
  • Communicates hunger, fear, discomfort (through crying or facial expression)

3 months to 6 months

  • Begins to respond to the word “no”
  • Responsive to changes in your tone of voice and to sounds other than speech
  • Babbles in a speech-like way and uses many different sounds, including sounds that begin with p, b, and m

6 months to 12 months

  • Responds to own name
  • Begins to respond to “no”
  • Turns and looks in the direction of sounds
  • Responds to sound by making sounds
  • Uses voice to express joy and displeasure
  • Knows familiar faces
  • Understands words for common items such as “cup,” “shoe,” or “juice”
  • Responds to requests (“Come here” or “Want more?”)
  • Communicates using gestures such as waving or holding up arms

12 months to 18 months

  • Tries to “talk” with you through babbling
  • Tries to imitate words
  • Says “dada” and “mama”
  • Uses exclamations, such as “oh-oh!”
  • Recognizes family members’ names
  • Follows simple commands (“roll the ball”)
  • Responds to “no”
  • Uses simple gestures, such as shaking head for “no”

18 months to 24 months

  • Knows a few parts of the body and can point to them when asked
  • Understands simple questions (“Where’s your shoe?”)
  • Enjoys simple stories, songs, and rhymes
  • Points to pictures, when named, in books
  • Acquires new words on a regular basis
  • Uses some one- or two-word questions (“Where kitty?” or “Go bye-bye?”)
  • Puts two words together (“More cookie” or “No juice”)
  • Asks specifically for his/her mother or father
  • Uses “hi,” “bye,” and “please,” with reminders
  • Requests items or actions by pointing or by using one word
  • Directs another’s attention to an object or action
  • Laughs at silly actions (ex. wearing a bowl as a hat)

24 months to 36 months

  • Points to 5-6 parts of a doll when asked
  • Uses 2-3 word sentences to verbalize desires and feelings
  • Asks for information about an object (ex. “shoe?” while pointing to shoe box)
  • Hum or tries to sing
  • Listens to short rhymes
  • Likes to imitate parents
  • Takes turns in play with other children
  • Treats a doll or stuffed animal as though it were alive
  • Refers to self by name and use “me” and “mine”
  • Knows some spatial concepts such as “in”, “on”
  • Knows descriptive words such as “big”, “happy”
  • Begins to use plurals such as “shoes” or “socks” and regular past tense verbs such as “jumped”
  • Follows two step directions

36 months to 48 months

  • Groups objects such as foods, clothes, etc.
  • Identifies colors
  • Able to describe the use of objects such as “fork,” “car,” etc.
  • Uses verbs that end in “ing,” such as “walking” and “talking”
  • Answers simple questions such as “What do you do when you are hungry?”
  • Match objects that have same function (as in putting a cup and plate together)
  • Speaks in sentences of five to six words
  • Understands the concepts of “same” and “different”
  • Tells stories
  • Follows three-part commands (ex. “Put the toys away, wash your hands, and come eat.”)
  • Recalls parts of a story

48 months to 60 months

  • Understands the concepts of  “big,” “little,” “tall,” “short”
  • Able to identify situations that would lead to happiness, sadness, or anger
  • Uses “a,” “an,” and “the” when speaking
  • Asks direct questions (“May I?” “Would you?”)
  • Wants explanations of “why” and “how”
  • Relates a simple experience she has had recently
  • Often prefer playing with other children to playing alone, unless deeply involved in a solitary task
  • Speaks sentences of more than five words
  • Uses future tense

For further information contact us at 941-360-0200 or visit us at www.pediatrictherapysolution.com

References

http://www.lpch.org/DiseaseHealthInfo/HealthLibrary/growth/aaslm.html

http://www.speech-language-therapy.com/devel2.htm

http://giftedkids.about.com/od/gifted101/p/milestones.htm

 

 

 

Articulation Station

Is your child working on correctly producing specific sounds to increase intelligibility in connected speech? Typical flashcards and drill activities can become boring very quickly! Fortunately there is a fun, interactive articulation app that kids of all ages love to play.


Articulation Station has 6 engaging activities at the word, sentence and story level. You are able to customize the target sounds, sound placement, and level of difficulty for your child’s needs. If your child is too young to read, picture prompts and auditory reinforcement are included to allow your child to practice by themselves. They are also able to record their responses and play them back to hear how they produced the sounds. This tool is great for self monitoring.

Articulation Station has a “store” within the app. This is where you can purchase the sound(s) your child needs help with. You have the option to purchase all of the sound programs at once for $49.99. The 22 programs included include: p, b, m, h, w, y, d, n, t, k, g, ng, f, v, ch, j, l, r , s, z, ch, and th. Individual sound prices range from $1.99 to $9.99 depending on the sound.  For further information or to purchase, log onto:  http://littlebeespeech.com/

Blog By: Mary Williams-Anderson

For Further information contact us at 941-360-0200 or visit us at www.pediatrictherapysolution.com